2013 Port Townsend Ukulele Festival Concert Preview: September 13



The 2013 Port Townsend Ukulele Festival gets underway on September 11 with workshops at Fort Worden State Park.

The Festival features two evenings of public performances, Friday, September 13 and Saturday, September 14. Each show begins at 7:30pm at the Joesph F. Wheeler Theater. Tickets are general admission – $15, purchase online.

The Friday performance brings together some fascinating ukulele artists:

  • Aaron Keim
  • Casey MacGill
  • Paul Hemmings
  • Jere and Greg Canote
  • Del Rey

Aaron Keim

Aaron Keim is a roots music renaissance man. His love of traditional string band music and jazz brought him to Boulder in 2003 to study for his graduate degree in music history with Tom Riis at University of Colorado. As The Quiet American, Aaron performs traditional and original folk music on guitar, ukulele and banjo (which he builds himself!) His inspirations include depression era string band music, old timey gospel, lo-fi garage rock and the modern indie-folk scene

Casey MacGill

Casey MacGill is a classic Hollywood character in musical style and appearance. MacGill plays boogie-woogie, swing, and stride piano. He blows a lyrical cornet, however his most unique instrumental voice is a 6-string tenor ukulele.

Paul Hemmings

With a repertoire ranging from Thelonious Monk and Antonio-Carlos Jobim to Bob Marley and The Beatles, Paul Hemmings and his Uketet have been winning over audiences at festivals and jazz clubs with their distinct blend of hard-swinging jazz, latin-infused polyrhythms, and reggae-tinged grooves, all peppered with fancy flights of improvisation.

Jere and Greg Canote

Jere and Greg Canote are as renowned for their affable attitudes and humor as they are for their music. Greg on fiddle, and Jere on guitar, and both on banjo ukes, perform zany concerts, play for dances, lead songs, and promote a good time.

Del Rey

As a teenager, Del Rey met bluesman Sam Chatmon who inspired her to become a blues queen. No, really! She’s made an international name for herself as a complex, pianistic guitarist, described by an observant fan as “a combination of Bo Carter and the Andrews Sisters.” But in the last 10 years she has also ascended the heady ranks of the ukulele royalty.