Port Townsend Writers’ Conference Schedule and Afternoon Workshops

Sunday, July 15, 2018

3:30-5:30—Check-in and welcome gathering outside the Centrum office building

5:30-6:15—Dinner

7:00—Orientation at the Joseph F. Wheeler Theater

7:15—Readings by Bruce Beasley; Debra Gwartney 

8:30—Welcome gathering: wine and conversation. Join us! (Building 262)

Monday, July 16, 2018

8:15-8:45—Breakfast

9-11:30—Morning Workshops

  • Ilya Kaminsky (Room F)
  • Bruce Beasley (Room H)
  • Emily Kendal Frey (Room I)
  • Suzanne Paola (Room K)
  • Luis Urrea (Room O)
  • Melissa Febos (Room J)
  • Shawn Vestal (Room D)
  • Bill Ransom (Room L)
  • Lily Hoang (Room M)
  • Patricia Henley (Room N)

11:45-12:30—Lunch

1-1:50—Afternoon Craft Lecture by Bruce Beasley (Room D):

1-1:50—Afternoon Craft Lecture by Patricia Henley (Room H):

2-3:30—Afternoon Workshops

  • Sam Ligon (Room N)
    “Whose Story is This?”
    Fiction workshops can further our critical and creative development as writers, but they can also stunt our development if we allow them to limit our consideration of what fiction is or might be. Legitimate critical workshop questions can begin to distort and disfigure the way we think about fiction if they become the only lens through which we consider a story—What’s at stake? Why now? Whose story is this?—because some stories operate outside the bounds of these questions. In this class, we’ll consider point of view and perspective, and stories that won’t provide an easy answer to “Whose story is this?” We’ll be looking at broad, fluid omniscience, distance, and proximity in William Trevor’s “Teresa’s Wedding,” at an evolving collective first person POV in Aimee Bender’s “Debbieland,” and at shifting perspectives in Dan Leone’s “The Weather” and Raymond Carver’s “Why Don’t You Dance,” our reactions to these stories an indication of what POV rules we currently apply to our own work.
  • Gary Copeland Lilley (Room J)
    “The Dead Poem Society”
    It’s about resurrecting them. That’s right, you know those dead poems I’m talking about. We all have them. Perhaps you have triaged them as needing life support, but those ghost poems keep nagging at you. Join Gary Copeland Lilley at a workshop about revision, and a re-visioning of the poem from the central images and essential details. Join others and become the poem-whisperer that you need to be. Check out the crafting skills that will sharpen images, enhance the rhythm and musicality, and doing it all without blowing up your original draft. Absolutely true, this ain’t snake-oil, this is putting a heartbeat into the poem using those words that you’ve already written. Yes, you can make your dead poems come alive. Bring five copies of your poem.
  • Alexandra Teague (Room F)
    “Writing By Listening (To Other Texts)”
    Jean Cocteau said, “The poet doesn’t invent. He listens.” This workshop will attune your listening: working from found/borrowed language in other texts. Using interactive exercises to create flash prose or poetry, we’ll explore how sounds and images and fragments of meaning from others (whether a cookbook or a Wikipedia entry or a 19th-century advertisement or a poem) can inspire, and even form the center of, our own acts of imaginative listening.
  • Kate Lebo (Room M)
    “Writing Non-Fiction with The Triggering Town
    In Richard Hugo’s indispensable text on poetry writing, The Triggering Town, he writes that poets are better off if their truth conforms to music and not the other way around. He also encourages writers to “write off the subject”—if you haven’t deviated from your original intent, you haven’t really found the poem. How can nonfiction writers take Hugo’s advice when, to a greater extent than poets, we must conform to the facts? How do we write off-subject while writing to fulfill a pitch or prompt? Do we have the same obligation to music as poets do? We’ll read and discuss excerpts of The Triggering Town to fuel our discussion on balancing music and fact, and how to find our essays the way Hugo found poems.
  • Katie Farris (Room L)
    “Their Eyes Locked Across the Room (No, Like, Literally!): Figurative Language, Cliché, and Concretizing Metaphor in Fabulist Fiction”
    My mother is a fish. ~William Faulkner
    How can we use and develop metaphor more effectively, on the level of the sentence, as well as at the larger structural level of the story or poem? How do we use metaphor and other figurative language as a jumping-off point for larger lyric and/or narrative constructions—character-building, world-building, plotting, poetic conceit, thought experiments? This class is designed to be thought-provoking for both poets and fiction writers, and will dip into several texts, probably including but not limited to: “As I Lay Dying” by William Faulkner, poems by Ponge, Komunyakaa, and Stein, “The Distance to the Moon” by Italo Calvino, “Wolf Hall” by Hilary Mantel, “On Exactitude in Science” by Borges, “Lolita” by Vladimir Nabokov, and/or others.
    Please note: this workshop will go two hours: from 2 pm to 4 pm.
  • Debra Gwartney (Room H)
    “Present Tense Memoir”
    It can be argued that memoir’s natural tense is past, as it allows the development of both the “then-I,” the person engaged in the action, and the “now-I,” the person who’s lived past the event or episode and is looking back on it with a central aim of self-awareness. Yet sometimes a stand-alone memoir needs the immediacy and intimacy of present tense. In this class, we’ll examine short-form pieces by Chang-rae Lee, Jo Ann Beard, and Mark Spragg, studying how these memoirists tap into the potency of present tense while also developing the “dual-I” that is critical to successful memoir.

5:30-6:15—Dinner

7:00—Readings by Gary Copeland Lilley; Suzanne Paola; Emily Kendal Frey

8:30—Reading by Jourdan Keith  (Building 262)

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

8:15-8:45—Breakfast

9-11:30—Morning Workshops

  • Ilya Kaminsky (Room F)
  • Bruce Beasley (Room H)
  • Emily Kendal Frey (Room I)
  • Suzanne Paola (Room K)
  • Luis Urrea (Room O)
  • Melissa Febos (Room J)
  • Shawn Vestal (Room D)
  • Bill Ransom (Room L)
  • Lily Hoang (Room M)
  • Patricia Henley (Room N)

11:45-12:30—Lunch

1-1:50—Afternoon Craft Lecture by Emily Kendal Frey (Room D):

1-1:50—Afternoon Craft Lecture by Suzanne Paola (Room H):

2-3:30—Afternoon Workshops

  • Sam Ligon (Room N)
    “Whose Story is This?”
    Fiction workshops can further our critical and creative development as writers, but they can also stunt our development if we allow them to limit our consideration of what fiction is or might be. Legitimate critical workshop questions can begin to distort and disfigure the way we think about fiction if they become the only lens through which we consider a story—What’s at stake? Why now? Whose story is this?—because some stories operate outside the bounds of these questions. In this class, we’ll consider point of view and perspective, and stories that won’t provide an easy answer to “Whose story is this?” We’ll be looking at broad, fluid omniscience, distance, and proximity in William Trevor’s “Teresa’s Wedding,” at an evolving collective first person POV in Aimee Bender’s “Debbieland,” and at shifting perspectives in Dan Leone’s “The Weather” and Raymond Carver’s “Why Don’t You Dance,” our reactions to these stories an indication of what POV rules we currently apply to our own work.
  • Gary Copeland Lilley (Room J)
    “The Dead Poem Society”
    It’s about resurrecting them. That’s right, you know those dead poems I’m talking about. We all have them. Perhaps you have triaged them as needing life support, but those ghost poems keep nagging at you. Join Gary Copeland Lilley at a workshop about revision, and a re-visioning of the poem from the central images and essential details. Join others and become the poem-whisperer that you need to be. Check out the crafting skills that will sharpen images, enhance the rhythm and musicality, and doing it all without blowing up your original draft. Absolutely true, this ain’t snake-oil, this is putting a heartbeat into the poem using those words that you’ve already written. Yes, you can make your dead poems come alive. Bring five copies of your poem.
  • Alexandra Teague (Room L)
    “Writing By Listening (To Other Texts)”
    Jean Cocteau said, “The poet doesn’t invent. He listens.” This workshop will attune your listening:  working from found/borrowed language in other texts. Using interactive exercises to create flash prose or poetry, we’ll explore how sounds and images and fragments of meaning from others (whether a cookbook or a Wikipedia entry or a 19th-century advertisement or a poem) can inspire, and even form the center of, our own acts of imaginative listening.
  • Kate Lebo (Room M)
    “The Homeopathic Essay”
    The guiding principle of homeopathic medicine is “like cures like.” To treat an illness, apply a medicine whose affect resembles your symptoms. Stinging nettles treat the sting of allergies, for example, or rose quartz channels the “rosy essence” of unconditional love. If homeopathic cures were essays, we’d understand them as guiding metaphors, as echoing images, as nets of reference that give our writing structure and resonance. In this class, we’ll tie the basic ideas behind homeopathy to the building blocks of lyric writing, as demonstrated in works we’ll read by Lily Hoang, Emily Kendal Frey, and Elizabeth Colen.
  • Debra Gwartney (Room H)
    “Present Tense Memoir”
    It can be argued that memoir’s natural tense is past, as it allows the development of both the “then-I,” the person engaged in the action, and the “now-I,” the person who’s lived past the event or episode and is looking back on it with a central aim of self-awareness. Yet sometimes a stand-alone memoir needs the immediacy and intimacy of present tense. In this class, we’ll examine short-form pieces by Chang-rae Lee, Jo Ann Beard, and Mark Spragg, studying how these memoirists tap into the potency of present tense while also developing the “dual-I” that is critical to successful memoir.
  • Tristan Beach (Room I)
    “Poetry from the Root: Chants, Prayers, Songs”
    Modeled after a workshop by Elena Georgiou, this workshop introduces poetry that takes its roots in the original, oral ritual aspects of poetry. Using poems by Sappho, Carolyn Forché, Emma Bolden, Georgiou, and others, this workshop will build a series of models for generating new poetry driven by the chant, the prayer, the history, the song, and/or the ballad. Worksheets and handouts will be utilized. Participants will share in the formulation of these models. The aim of this workshop is to have fun, to experiment, and to re/trace the earliest roots of Western poetry in participants’ own new work.
  • Jourdan Imani Keith (Room F)
    “Of Topography and Tears: Our Land, Our Lives”
    “It is such a secret place, the land of tears.” ~“The Little Prince”
    The story of our lives is shaped by where we dwell. Rose-Lynn Fisher’s “aerial” photo collection, “The Topography of Tears,” reveals the geography of our emotions. We map our place in time, land, tears, memory, the rights we fight for and the tyranny we resist with words. Together, they become our soul’s topography. We’ll use images, the contour lines of map,s and the work of poets who create a cartography of resistance to generate poems and essays with a palpable texture.

5:30-6:15—Dinner

7:00—Readings by Sam Ligon; Melissa Febos

8:30—Reading by Gayle Kaune (Building 262)

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

8:15-8:45—Breakfast

9-11:30—Morning Workshops

  • Ilya Kaminsky (Room F)
  • Bruce Beasley (Room H)
  • Emily Kendal Frey (Room I)
  • Suzanne Paola (Room K)
  • Luis Urrea (Room O)
  • Melissa Febos (Room J)
  • Shawn Vestal (Room D)
  • Bill Ransom (Room L)
  • Lily Hoang (Room M)
  • Patricia Henley (Room N)

11:45-12:30—Lunch

1-1:50—Afternoon Craft Lecture by Melissa Febos (Room D):

1-1:50—Afternoon Craft Lecture by Bill Ransom (Room H):

2-3:30—Afternoon Workshops

  • Sam Ligon (Room N)
    “Accumulation, Time, and the List Story”
    List stories often feel like collages—fragmented and accumulating power as they unfold, using their lists as organizing principals and sometimes as tumbling drivers. They often seem to exist outside the clock or unfold across a broader sweep of time than a more traditional narrative. Susan Minot’s “Lust” is more fragmented and less considered with a traditional fictional clock than Tim O’Brien’s “The Things They Carried,” but both stories rely on their lists, and to some degree, take refuge in them. In this class we’ll look at three stories shaped by lists and unhinged in time: Jamaica Kinkaid’s “Girl,” a list in the imperative mood of a mother instructing her daughter; Blake Butler’s “Hair Loop,” a fragmented, numbered list of a narrator’s observations on hair, which becomes the object around which meaning is created as detailed observations   accumulate; and Robert Coover’s “Going for a Beer,” a meditation on time and mortality, the moments of the story almost unable to keep up with themselves, almost chasing themselves, as the story tumbles toward its end.
  • Gary Copeland Lilley (Room J)
    “The Dead Poem Society”
    It’s about resurrecting them. That’s right, you know those dead poems I’m talking about. We all have them. Perhaps you have triaged them as needing life support, but those ghost poems keep nagging at you. Join Gary Copeland Lilley at a workshop about revision, and a re-visioning of the poem from the central images and essential details. Join others and become the poem-whisperer that you need to be. Check out the crafting skills that will sharpen images, enhance the rhythm and musicality, and doing it all without blowing up your original draft. Absolutely true, this ain’t snake-oil, this is putting a heartbeat into the poem using those words that you’ve already written. Yes, you can make your dead poems come alive. Bring ten copies of your poem.
  • Alexandra Teague (Room H)
    “Writing By Listening (To Rhythms and Patterns)”
    Jean Cocteau said, “The poet doesn’t invent. He listens.” Ilya Kaminsky said, “Poetry [or writing] . . . exists above any speech.” In this workshop, we’ll use interactive writing exercises and a brief introduction to rhythm and meter to explore how attention to stresses and syntax can amp up the sounds in our writing. We’ll work on more clearly hearing the sounds in a range of writers from Robert Browning to Danez Smith, consider how even highly patterned sound can still sound conversational, try various rewordings of the same idea, and listen closely to rhythms and possible patterns emerging in our own drafts.
  • Kate Lebo (Room M)
    “The Memory Buffet: Using Food to Create Hybrid Literary Forms”
    Cookbooks appear so approachable, so consumable, so full of wisdom we crave. Let’s co-opt them make texts that have little to do with cooking. In this class we’ll read selections from The Futurist Cookbook, Pie & Whiskey, and “food writing” from Jiao Tong and Gertrude Stein to learn how we can borrow culinary forms to create hybrid texts that transcend food. Then we’ll start our own cross-genre projects using elements of food writing as our organizing principles.
  • Katie Farris (Room F)
    “Their Eyes Locked Across the Room (No, Like, Literally!): Figurative Language, Cliché, and Concretizing Metaphor in Fabulist Fiction”
    My mother is a fish. ~William Faulkner
    How can we use and develop metaphor more effectively, on the level of the sentence, as well as at the larger structural level of the story or poem? How do we use metaphor and other figurative language as a jumping-off point for larger lyric and/or narrative constructions—character-building, world-building, plotting, poetic conceit, thought experiments? This class is designed to be thought-provoking for both poets and fiction writers, and will dip into several texts, probably including but not limited to: “As I Lay Dying” by William Faulkner, poems by Ponge, Komunyakaa, and Stein, “The Distance to the Moon” by Italo Calvino, “Wolf Hall” by Hilary Mantel, “On Exactitude in Science” by Borges, “Lolita” by Vladimir Nabokov, and/or others.
    Please note: this workshop will go two hours: from 2 pm to 4 pm.
  • Debra Gwartney (Room I)
    “Highly Relevant Detail”
    Specificity in a piece of personal narrative grips the reader—it’s detail that invites the reader into the experience and into the emotional space of the prose. However, it’s also easy to overuse detail so that the reader is stuck in a morass—she can’t sort out how to feel or where to stand in relation to what’s on the page. In this class, we’ll talk about the selection of highly relevant specificity, clarifying the emotional tenor of a given scene and pointing the reader toward meaning. In restricting yourself to relevant specificity, rather than a bombardment of any and all detail, you actually add to the verisimilitude of the prose.

5:30-6:15—Dinner

7:00—Readings by Alexandra Teague; Shawn Vestal; Patricia Henley downtown at the Northwind Arts Center (701 Water Street)

Thursday, July 19, 2018

8:15-8:45—Breakfast

9-11:30—Morning Workshops

  • Ilya Kaminsky (Room F)
  • Bruce Beasley (Room H)
  • Emily Kendal Frey (Room I)
  • Suzanne Paola (Room K)
  • Luis Urrea (Room O)
  • Melissa Febos (Room J)
  • Shawn Vestal (Room D)
  • Bill Ransom (Room L)
  • Lily Hoang (Room M)
  • Patricia Henley (Room N)

11:45-12:30—Lunch

1-1:50—Afternoon Craft Lecture by Shawn Vestal (Room D):

1-1:50—Afternoon Craft Lecture by Ilya Kaminsky (Room H):

2-3:30—Afternoon Workshops

  • Sam Ligon (Room N)
    “The First-Person Indictment and the Power of Shame”
    First person narrators are not always fully aware of their flaws or willing to own up to them. Some stories, however, are shaped by a narrator revealing something essential and shameful about herself—not as a confession necessarily, but as the only way to tell the story, shaping a kind of raw, naked, unflattering, unsettling, true portrait of a human. And because such a story feels true, and because the narrator indicts herself before we can indict her, we forgive her in a way, become close to her because of her honesty and the intimacy created by her revelation. In this class we’ll look at two stories in which first person narrators indict themselves before we can indict them, who use their shame to get to the heart of their stories, and whose stories ultimately transcend shame—Larry Brown’s “Facing the Music,” and Amy Hempel’s “In the Cemetery Where Al Jolson Is Buried.”
  • Gary Copeland Lilley (Room J)
    “The Dead Poem Society”
    It’s about resurrecting them. That’s right, you know those dead poems I’m talking about. We all have them. Perhaps you have triaged them as needing life support, but those ghost poems keep nagging at you. Join Gary Copeland Lilley at a workshop about revision, and a re-visioning of the poem from the central images and essential details. Join others and become the poem-whisperer that you need to be. Check out the crafting skills that will sharpen images, enhance the rhythm and musicality, and doing it all without blowing up your original draft. Absolutely true, this ain’t snake-oil, this is putting a heartbeat into the poem using those words that you’ve already written. Yes, you can make your dead poems come alive. Bring ten copies of your poem.
  • Alexandra Teague (Room H)
    “Writing By Listening (To Rhythms and Patterns)”
    Jean Cocteau said, “The poet doesn’t invent. He listens.” Ilya Kaminsky said, “Poetry [or writing]…exists above any speech.” In this workshop, we’ll use interactive writing exercises and a brief introduction to rhythm and meter to explore how attention to stresses and syntax can amp up the sounds in our writing. We’ll work on more clearly hearing the sounds in a range of writers from Robert Browning to Danez Smith, consider how even highly patterned sound can still sound conversational, try various rewordings of the same idea, and listen closely to rhythms and possible patterns emerging in our own drafts.
  • Kate Lebo (Room M)
    “The Author is Plural: An Erasure Workshop”
    In conversation, mishearing doesn’t eliminate what was actually said, but it can start a parallel conversation—an imagined exchange layered over the actual. Erasure does something similar, where one writer takes the work of another and makes a new text from a printed one. An erased text survives its erasure; in most cases, we can buy another copy. So it’s not stealing or destroying, exactly. Erasure is more like talking to someone who just left the room. Which also means it’s like talking to ourselves. In this workshop we’ll study the erasures of Tom Phillips, Jennifer Borges Foster, Srikanth Reddy, Matthea Harvey, Sappho, and others. Then we’ll make our own erasures, borrowing from literature, visual art, and book art to find our voices within another writer’s.
  • Debra Gwartney (Room I)
    “Highly Relevant Detail”
    Specificity in a piece of personal narrative grips the reader—it’s detail that invites the reader into the experience and into the emotional space of the prose. However, it’s also easy to overuse detail so that the reader is stuck in a morass—she can’t sort out how to feel or where to stand in relation to what’s on the page. In this class, we’ll talk about the selection of highly relevant specificity, clarifying the emotional tenor of a given scene and pointing the reader toward meaning. In restricting yourself to relevant specificity, rather than a bombardment of any and all detail, you actually add to the verisimilitude of the prose.
  • Tristan Beach (Room L)
    “Poetry from the Root: Chants, Prayers, Songs”
    Modeled after a workshop by Elena Georgiou, this workshop introduces poetry that takes its roots in the original, oral ritual aspects of poetry. Using poems by Sappho, Carolyn Forché, Emma Bolden, Georgiou, and others, this workshop will build a series of models for generating new poetry driven by the chant, the prayer, the history, the song, and/or the ballad. Worksheets and handouts will be utilized. Participants will share in the formulation of these models. The aim of this workshop is to have fun, to experiment, and to re/trace the earliest roots of Western poetry in participants’ own new work.
  • Jourdan Imani Keith (Room K)
    “Of Topography and Tears: Our Land, Our Lives”
    “It is such a secret place, the land of tears.” ~“The Little Prince”
    The story of our lives is shaped by where we dwell. Rose-Lynn Fisher’s “aerial” photo collection, “The Topography of Tears,” reveals the geography of our emotions. We map our place in time, land, tears, memory, the rights we fight for and the tyranny we resist with words. Together, they become our soul’s topography. We’ll use images, the contour lines of map,s and the work of poets who create a cartography of resistance to generate poems and essays with a palpable texture.

5:30-6:15—Dinner

7:00—Readings by Kate Lebo; Luis Urrea

8:30—Reading by Tom Mitchell (Building 262)

Friday, July 20, 2018

8:15-8:45—Breakfast

9-11:30—Morning Workshops

  • Ilya Kaminsky (Room F)
  • Bruce Beasley (Room H)
  • Emily Kendal Frey (Room I)
  • Suzanne Paola (Room K)
  • Luis Urrea (Room O)
  • Melissa Febos (Room J)
  • Shawn Vestal (Room D)
  • Bill Ransom (Room L)
  • Lily Hoang (Room M)
  • Patricia Henley (Room N)

11:45-12:30—Lunch

1-1:50—Afternoon Craft Lecture by Luis Urrea (Room D):

1-1:50—Afternoon Craft Lecture by Lily Hoang (Room H)

2-3:30—Afternoon Workshops

  • Sam Ligon (Room N)
    “ A Close Reading of James Baldwin’s ‘Sonny’s Blues’”
    Near the end of James Baldwin’s “Sonny’s Blues,” our narrator realizes that “while the tale of how we suffer, and how we are delighted, and how we may triumph is never new, it always must be heard. There isn’t any other tale to tell, it’s the only light we’ve got in all this darkness.” In our close reading of this tale of suffering and triumph, alienation and connection, we’ll be approaching a finished story as writers, examining craft, style, and technique, the elements of fiction. We’ll consider choices the writer made and how those choices served to shape, limit, and inform the writing. Rather than reading from any theoretical point of view, we’ll read as practitioners trying to understand how a story was put together, and, by extension, how fiction is, has been, or might be made. Our approach should be guided by a struggle to see beyond what the story is, leading us, instead, to an examination of how the story was made. You’ll need to read “Sonny’s Blues” before class—copies of which will be available at the coffee table in the schoolhouse—and be prepared for discussion.
  • Gary Copeland Lilley (Room J)
    “The Dead Poem Society”
    It’s about resurrecting them. That’s right, you know those dead poems I’m talking about. We all have them. Perhaps you have triaged them as needing life support, but those ghost poems keep nagging at you. Join Gary Copeland Lilley at a workshop about revision, and a re-visioning of the poem from the central images and essential details. Join others and become the poem-whisperer that you need to be. Check out the crafting skills that will sharpen images, enhance the rhythm and musicality, and doing it all without blowing up your original draft. Absolutely true, this ain’t snake-oil, this is putting a heartbeat into the poem using those words that you’ve already written. Yes, you can make your dead poems come alive. Bring fifteen copies of your poem.
  • Alexandra Teague (Room I)
    “Writing By Listening (To Music)”
    In addition to ekphrastic poems that respond to visual art, poets have written in the style of Bach, or bagpipe music, or Al Green, or Chet Baker, drawing on elements of these musician’s and music’s styles to pace and shape the sounds in their own poems. We’ll read some of these poems and listen to the related music, and then try our own responses inspired by careful listening–expanding the sorts of musicality that we can bring to our writing.
  • Debra Gwartney (Room H)
    “Dialogue in Personal Narrative”
    In this workshop, we’ll study the sharp, smart, and highly effective dialogue in two stand-alone memoir-essays: Ariel Levy’s “Thanksgiving in Mongolia,” and Helen Garner’s “Dreams of Her Real Self.” Come prepared to write (or revise) a scene that includes a conversation between “I” and another character.

5:30-6:15—Dinner

7:00—Readings by Bill Ransom; Katie Farris; Ilya Kaminsky

8:30—Open-Mike (Building 262)

Saturday, July 21, 2018

8:15-8:45—Breakfast

9-11:30—Morning Workshops

  • Ilya Kaminsky (Room F)
  • Bruce Beasley (Room I)
  • Cornelius Eady (Room H)
  • Suzanne Paola (Room K)
  • Luis Urrea (Room O)
  • Melissa Febos (Room J)
  • Shawn Vestal (Room D)
  • Bill Ransom (Room L)
  • Lily Hoang (Room M)
  • Patricia Henley (Room N)

11:45-12:30—Lunch

1-1:50—Faculty Booksigning

2-5— Pie School with Kate Lebo (Building 262)

If you’ve ever been at a loss for pastry, nervous about filling, confused by pie lore, or annoyed by fussy recipes, Pie School is here to make it all better. You’ll learn how to make dough by hand, select the best fruit, put a double crust pie together, bake it to perfection, and write your own pie recipes. You’ll walk away knowing how to make the best pie you’ve ever had, and your pies will be enjoyed by all who attend Centrum’s Pie & Whiskey night. All materials are provided by Kate and Centrum, but bring an apron (if you can) and wear sensible, close-toed shoes. Class will be a couple hours; baking will take a couple more. Feel free to pop in and out.

5:30-6:15—Dinner

7:00—Readings by Barry Lopez; Lily Hoang

8:30—Pie & Whiskey Night (Building 262)

Sunday, July 22, 2018

8:15-8:45—Breakfast

9—Airport shuttle leaves

Dorm check out by 11:00 am

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